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For today's Motivation Monday!

Today is the 110th birthday of the United States Army Reserve!

Good Morning Wildcats!

Today's Throwback Thursday – 81st ARCOM and the Vietnam War

This month marks the 50th anniversary of the call-up of Army Reserve units for service in the Vietnam conflict.
During the late 50s and early 60s, growing numbers of American military advisors had served with the Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) which was engaged low level conflict with Communist backed irregular and regular forces. In March 1965, President Lyndon Johnson made a major escalation in the conflict by introducing Marines in an active combat role. American participation in the Vietnam War grew rapidly, and by the end of 1967 more than 463,000 American service members were deployed in and around the country. Despite the strain on the active Army, President Johnson refused to allow a call up of the Army Reserves over political concerns. Only in the aftermath of the major Tet Offensive did Johnson bow to demands from the Joint Chiefs of Staff for additional soldiers and mobilization of selected Reserve Component (RC) units. Even then, President Johnson only agreed to a minor troop boost and limited RC mobilizations.
On 11 April 1968, the Secretary of Defense announced the activation of 76 RC Army Reserve units, a total of 20,034 Soldiers. Of that original group, many units were sent to Europe to bolster the American presence in West Germany. Only 42 units, with a total of 5869 Soldiers, were actually selected to deploy to serve in the Vietnam combat zone. Three of those units belonged to the 81st Army Reserve Command (ARCOM), the 413th Finance Section, East Point Georgia; 319th Transportation Company, Augusta Georgia; 231st Transportation Company (Medium Boat) from St. Petersburg Florida.
On 13 May 1968, those Army Reservists designated to deploy to South Vietnam mustered at their local Reserve centers. After drawing personal equipment and checking records, the units reported to their designated active Army mobilization stations to receive equipment and personnel fillers before performing an additional three to seven months of collective training before deploying to Vietnam.
The Florida based 231st Transportation Company (Medium Boat), mobilized to Fort Eustis Virginia, where it completed four months of collective training before deployment in August 1968. Nicknamed Granddad’s Gator’s” in a nod to their Florida roots, the 231st Transportation Company successfully completed fourteen months in theater without a single combat loss. The unit principally hauled equipment and supplies in the Mekong Delta, accomplishing their mission so well that the company received the National Defense Transportation Association Annual Award for 1969.
After completing initial training at Fort Lee, Virginia, the 319th Transportation Company (home station of Augusta Georgia) deployed to Long Binh, South Vietnam in September 1968. Attached to the 48th Transportation Group, the 319th Trans Company successfully completed around 1.1 million road miles while hauling Soldiers and supplies in support of American combat divisions operating in the region. When the unit demobilized in July 1969, it was awarded a Meritorious Unit Commendation, and credited with four campaign streamers. During its deployment, elements of the 319th Transportation Company fought off seven major enemy ambushes, suffering one combat death and three additional soldiers were wounded in combat.
The 413th Finance Section (Disbursing), from Atlanta Georgia spent almost six months at Fort Benning before deploying on 27 October 1968. The 413th Finance Section was attached to the US Army Support Command, based at Phu Bai, with a small Finance detachment based at Quang Tri. When the unit redeployed in October 1969 after a year in country, it had successfully managed a $3 million payroll for more than 12, 000 Soldiers in non-divisional units across South Vietnam.

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Todays Watch Us Wednesday focuses on Hurricane Irma recovery in the Florida Keys;

Good Morning Wildcats!

For today's Trivia Tuesday, on Apr 29 1937
Ronald Reagan Enlists in the Army Enlisted Reserve

After completing fourteen home-study Army Extension Courses, Reagan enlisted in the Army Enlisted Reserve[26] on April 29, 1937, as a private assigned to Troop B, 322nd Cavalry at Des Moines, Iowa.[27] He was appointed Second Lieutenant in the Officers Reserve Corps of the Cavalry on May 25, 1937, and on June 18 was assigned to the 323rd Cavalry.

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Hello Wildcats!

Safety Message:

Egg recall:
US recalls more than 200 million eggs over salmonella fears
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/04/16/us-recalls-more-than-200-million-eggs-over-salmonella-fears.html

Romaine Lettuce:
Warning from CDC: Do not eat romaine lettuce:
http://www.wral.com/warning-from-cdc-do-not-eat-romaine-lettuce/17487801/

Use the links to obtain more information. And If the links above are not
hyperlinked, cut and paste them into your search engine. Please share this
information with others.

Thank you!

GB

Gary W. Ballew, CSP
Deputy Safety Director
U.S. Army Reserve Command

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Hello Wildcats!

For today's Motivation Monday! Are you up for the challenge?

Here’s your #USARBirthday110 workout challenge! Tag us on your workout video before April 23rd for a chance to be featured on our page.

#MondayMotivation

Army Reserve 110th Birthday WOD

Hello Wildcats!For today's Motivation Monday! Are you up for the challenge? Here’s your #USARBirthday110 workout challenge! Tag us on your workout video before April 23rd for a chance to be featured on our page.#MondayMotivation

Posted by 81st Readiness Division on Monday, April 16, 2018

Hello Wildcats!

For today's Frequently Asked Friday; We ask, what is Operations Security (OPSEC)

Operations Security, or OPSEC, is the process by which we protect unclassified information that can be used against us. OPSEC challenges us to look at ourselves through the eyes of an adversary (individuals, groups, countries, organizations). Essentially, anyone who can harm people, resources, or mission is an adversary.

OPSEC should be used to protect information, and thereby deny the adversary the ability to act. Nearly 90% of the information collected comes from "Open Sources". Any information that can be obtained freely, without breaking the law, is Open Source. . It is social network sites, tweets, text messages, blogs, videos, photos, GPS mapping, newsletters, magazine or newspaper articles, your college thesis, or anything else that is publicly available.

Our OPSEC objective is to ensure a safe and secure environment. OPSEC is best employed daily when making choices about what communications to use, what is written in emails or said on the phone, postings on social networking sites and blogs. Any information you put in the public domain is also available to your adversaries.

The bottom line is that we can be are our own worst enemy. Google yourself or your organization and see how much you can find out.

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Today in History!

A new era in space flight began on April 12, 1981, when Space Shuttle Columbia, or STS-1, soared into orbit from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Astronaut John Young, a veteran of four previous spaceflights including a walk on the moon in 1972, commanded the mission. Navy test pilot Bob Crippen piloted the mission and would go on to command three future shuttle missions. The shuttle was humankind's first re-usable spacecraft. The orbiter would launch like a rocket and land like a plane. The two solid rocket boosters that helped push them into space would also be re-used, after being recovered in the ocean. Only the massive external fuel tank would burn up as it fell back to Earth. It was all known as the Space Transportation System.

Twenty years prior to the historic launch, on April 12, 1961, the era of human spaceflight began when Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human to orbit the Earth in his Vostock I spacecraft. The flight lasted 108 minutes.

Pictured here: a timed exposure of STS-1, at Launch Pad A, Complex 39, turns the space vehicle and support facilities into a night- time fantasy of light. Structures to the left of the shuttle are the fixed and the rotating service structure.

Image Credit: NASA

https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_2488.html

Good morning Wildcats!

For today's Throwback Thursday – Army Aviation

This week’s Throwback Thursday recognizes the birthday of one of the “younger” branches in the Army, the Aviation branch, which was on 12 April 1983.
The Army began experimenting with aircraft in 1909 by buying a Wright aircraft. Little official interest was given to air power and when the United States entered World War I in 1917, the Army possessed only a relative handful of obsolete aircraft. By the end of the war, the Army Air Service had grown to 11,000 modern aircraft supported by 190,000 Aviation personnel.
Despite strong efforts from Air Service leaders to set up an entirely independent air force, Army aviation remained under the purview of the Signal Corps until 1926. Despite the impact of the Great Depression on the Army budget, Aviation leaders made great advances in the theory and practice of strategic bombing, and the use of radio equipped light aircraft “grasshoppers” in directing artillery fires.
With the establishment of the Army Air Corps, Army aviation became a separate branch equal to infantry, cavalry and artillery. In 1941, the status of the Air Corps, encompassing strategic bombers, fighters and transport aircraft, was elevated to that of the Army Ground Forces. The Army Ground Forces still had a need for their own organic spotter aircraft, so in 1942 the Secretary of War established a separate aviation service within the Field Artillery branch.
During World War II L-4 Grasshopper and L-5 Sentinel utility aircraft were used to great effect on the battlefields of North Africa, Italy and Europe in adjusting Army and Navy fires and performing reconnaissance. Training of the pilots and ground crews was accomplished primarily at the Field Artillery at Ft. Sill Oklahoma.
Initial tests with rotary wing aircraft during the Philippines campaign showed their potential in medical evacuation, transport and command roles. During the Korean conflict, improved helicopters proved their value due to the rugged terrain and limited road network.
To meet the urgent need for trained aviators, the Army introduced warrant officer pilots and attempted to grow the size the Army Aviation School at Ft. Sill. Space competition with artillery and aviation training led in 1954 to the move of the Aviation school to Camp Rucker Alabama, a wartime mobilization camp. In October 1954, the Army Aviation School officially began operations at Rucker, and the status of the camp was changed to permanent status in February 1955.
The Army also gained control over fixed wing pilot training from the Air Force, and these pilots were trained at Camp Gary, Texas until 1959. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, the Army performed much work on developing armament systems for helicopters, and the concept of organic air mobility-later termed air assault.
After extensive tests by the 11th Air Assault Division (test), the 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) was organized and deployed to Vietnam. There, the concept of air mobility was thoroughly established, epitomized by the UH-1 “Huey” used in medical evacuation (MEDEVAC), command and control, air assault and transport roles.
Post-Vietnam, the Aviation community worked to develop new doctrine, tactics, aircraft and unit structure to support a mid-intensity conflict against the Warsaw Pact. New aircraft were developed with the combat lessons of Vietnam in mind, resulting in the UH-60 Blackhawk, AH-64 Apache, and upgraded models of the CH-47 Chinook and OH-58 Kiowa.
The maturation of Army Aviation structure and doctrine in the early 1980s, coupled with extensive studies of aviation support by the US Army Training and Doctrine Command led the Army Chief of Staff to recommend a separate Aviation branch. The Secretary of the Army approved the proposal on 12 April 1983, the date recognized as the birthday of the Army Aviation Branch.
Since that time, the Aviation Branch has grown in size and complexity by absorbing Air Traffic Control and Aviation Logistics functions, and the creation of Aviation specific officer and non-commissioned officer education courses-all at Fort Rucker. During operations in Grenada, Panama, Desert Shield/Storm and most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Army Aviation branch has shown itself an indispensable member of the total Army team.

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Good morning Wildcats!

For Watch us Wednesday, it's Time to decide!

Don’t forget, you have until the end of the year to make a decision on whether the new #BlendedRetirement system is right for you and your family.

Learn more: https://go.usa.gov/xnGAv

Time to decide

Good morning Wildcats!For Watch us Wednesday, it's Time to decide! Don’t forget, you have until the end of the year to make a decision on whether the new #BlendedRetirement system is right for you and your family. Learn more: https://go.usa.gov/xnGAv

Posted by 81st Readiness Division on Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Good morning Wildcats!

For today's Trivia Tuesday: In honor of America's entrance 6 April 1917.

Why were American soldiers in WWI called doughboys?

It’s unknown exactly how U.S. service members in World War I (1914-18) came to be dubbed doughboys—the term most typically was used to refer to troops deployed to Europe as part of the American Expeditionary Forces—but there are a variety of theories about the origins of the nickname. According to one explanation, the term dates back to the Mexican War of 1846-48, when American infantrymen made long treks over dusty terrain, giving them the appearance of being covered in flour, or dough. As a variation of this account goes, the men were coated in the dust of adobe soil and as a result were called “adobes,” which morphed into “dobies” and, eventually, “doughboys.” Among other theories, according to “War Slang” by Paul Dickson the American journalist and lexicographer H.L. Mencken claimed the nickname could be traced to Continental Army soldiers who kept the piping on their uniforms white through the application of clay. When the troops got rained on the clay on their uniforms turned into “doughy blobs,” supposedly leading to the doughboy moniker.
However doughboy came into being, it was just one of the nicknames given to those who fought in the Great War. For example, “poilu” (“hairy one”) was a term for a French soldier, as a number of them had beards or mustaches, while a popular slang term for a British soldier was “Tommy,” an abbreviation of Tommy Atkins, a generic name (along the lines of John Doe) used on government forms.
America’s last World War I doughboy, Frank Buckles, died in 2011 in West Virginia at age 110. Buckles enlisted in the Army at age 16 in August 1917, four months after the U.S. entered the conflict, and drove military vehicles in France. One of 4.7 million Americans who served in the war, Buckles was buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Story courtesy of the History Channel website:
https://www.history.com/news/ask-history/why-were-americans-who-served-in-world-war-i-called-doughboys

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Welcome to Motivation Monday!

Today we would like to let you know about the Yellow Ribbon program.

The Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program is a DoD-wide effort to promote the well-being of National Guard and Reserve members, their families and communities, by connecting them with resources throughout the deployment cycle. Through Yellow Ribbon events, Service members and loved ones connect with local resources before, during, and after deployments. Reintegration during post-deployment is a critical time for members of the National Guard and Reserve, as they often live far from military installations and other members of their units. Commanders and leaders play a critical role in assuring that Reserve Service members and their families attend Yellow Ribbon events where they can access information on health care, education and training opportunities, financial, and legal benefits. We work in government and non-government partners, including the Small Business Administration and Departments of Labor and Veterans Affairs, to provide up-to-date and relevant information to the members of the All-Volunteer force and their families.

For more information about the Yellow Ribbon program visit:

http://www.yellowribbon.mil/yrrp/aboutUs.html

For 81st RD Yellow Ribbon training dates, see the attached schedule:

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Wildcats!

Today's Frequently Asked Friday, we would like to make you aware of a new Scam targeting Military Members.

Community Alert

Army Community Service wants you to know about a new scam that is targeting some of our military members and this is how it works:

A person calls you (from a legit spoofed financial institution phone number), stating he/she works for the financial institution you bank with and proceeds to inform you that there is suspicious activity on your bank account. They then tell you that they want to start the process of locking your account and that they will send a text with a code to your personal cell phone to confirm identity. This person stays on the line and then asks you to read them the security code that was sent to your cell phone. It is at this point where you have given them full access to your account and the scammer transfers funds from your account to his/her account. If you receive a call from your financial institution, recommend disconnecting and calling them to confirm identity and then discuss concerns.

If you would like more information or need assistance, please don't hesitate to call Army Community Service at 751-5256 and ask to speak with a financial counselor.

Respectfully,
Madelyn A. Mercado
Army Community Service Division Chief

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The Commanding General of the 81st Readiness Division, MG Kenneth Jones, was published in the March - April Sustainment Magazine.

The article called "Joint Logistics Enterprise of the Future" is located on page 20 at the following link:

http://issuu.com/fredbaker/docs/marapr2018?e=6254307/58585705

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Today's Throwback Thursday:

The US Army and the Holocaust

April marks the month commemorating the memory of the Holocaust, so this week’s Throwback Thursday will briefly discuss the US Army’s role in bringing the horror of Jewish genocide to an end.
In the final days of World War II in Europe, elements of the 4th Armored Division made a uniquely horrid discovery at the town of Ohrdruf, a camp filled with emaciated prisoners, and thousands of corpses. In nearby Nordhausen, another American regimental combat team found a camp filled with 3000 dead and 700 near-dead prisoners who had been used as slave laborers in a nearby V2 rocket factory. The living prisoners were near death, “…emaciated beyond all imagination or description. Their legs and arms were sticks with huge bulging joints, and their loins were fouled with their own excrement. Their eyes were sunk so deep that they looked blind.”
A quick investigation revealed the shocking truth; the Nazi regime had deliberately conducted the mass extermination of Jews, Communists and other “undesirables.” Word reached General Dwight Eisenhower, who set out with Generals George Patton and Omar Bradley to visit the Ohrdruf camp and personally verify the lurid reports. The three American generals were sickened and appalled at the sight of thousands of bodies piled in a shed and nearby burial pit. General Patton, the hardened combat veteran, became physically ill, and Eisenhower blanched at the sight-but insisted on seeing the entire camp. In writing to General George C. Marshall, Eisenhower described scenes that “beggar description…so overpowering as to leave me a bit sick…I visited every nook and cranny…to be in a position from then on to testify about these things in case there ever grew up at home the belief…that the stories of Nazi brutality were just propaganda.” Eisenhower ordered all American soldiers in the vicinity to visit the camp, and correspondents and Congressional delegations from back home to spread the word about the Nazi evil.
Once the problem with the concentration camps was recognized, American combat divisions moved quickly to locate and liberate the remainder to minimize further death. Even with emergency medical care and rations, many of the newly liberated inmates continued to die while Army administrators struggled to process and repatriate some 7 million displaced persons in Germany and Austria, including tens of thousands of surviving Jews. Despite some serious early missteps, the treatment of the Jewish survivors improved, and in time many were able to emigrate to the new nation of Israel or to the United States.
In 1985, two Holocaust survivors on the US Holocaust Memorial Council requested permission from the Secretary of the Army to formally honor those US Army divisions that liberated prisoners from the Nazi concentration camps. The Secretary of the Army approved the request, and since then the colors of 36 Army divisions appear on rotational display at the Holocaust Memorial Museum. Furthermore, the colors of all 36 divisions are prominently displayed in the US Capitol Rotunda during the annual Days of Remembrance ceremony. Of the 36 divisions, seven had lineage to the old Organized Reserve divisions: 71st, 80th, 89th, 90th, 99th, 103d and 104th.

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In a continuation of the Puerto Rico Hurricane assessment tour by the 81st RD Commander, CSM
and DPW Director, here are some more photos, these are from ECS 126 located in Juana Diaz, PR

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The 81st RD Commander, MG Kenneth Jones and CSM Levi Maynard traveled to Puerto Rico to tour facilities and assess Hurricane damage and continued recovery efforts today. They are pictured here touring the PFC Santos Cruz-Aviles Army Reserve Center in Salinas PR.
Col. Sean McDonald, 81st Director of Public Works, leads the 81st RD Commander through the tour.

(Photos by SFC Diana Anzaldua)

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Good Morning Wildcats!

For today's Watch Us Wednesday:

Trained & ready

When America's #USArmyReserve is called upon to serve, we'll be ready.

#ColdSteelII Fort McCoy

Tick Tock

Good Morning Wildcats!For today's Watch Us Wednesday:Trained & readyWhen America's #USArmyReserve is called upon to serve, we'll be ready.#ColdSteelII Fort McCoy

Posted by 81st Readiness Division on Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Good morning Wildcats!

For Today's Trivia Tuesday, we look at This week in History!

Did you know:
That on April 4, 1949 NATO was founded.

On April 6, 1917 U.S. enters WWI.

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Welcome Wildcats!

Today's Motivation Monday focuses on "Learning from the Holocaust"
For those of you who live in the Fort Jackson area, there will be an observance of the Holocaust "Days of Remembrance" hosted by the Leader Training Brigade and the Drill Sergeant's Academy at the NCO Club on April 10.
See the attached flyer for details.

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Today has been established as Vietnam War Veteran's Day!

National Vietnam War Veterans Day is a commemorative holiday in the United States which recognizes the sacrifices that veterans and their families made during the Vietnam War. It is also a day to give proper recognition to the men and women who returned home from that war and didn’t receive a proper welcome home. It’s a holiday that’s been celebrated since 1973 on either March 29th or March 30th of each year through a patchwork of state resolutions. However, in 2017, the date of the holiday was set as March 29th by U.S President Donald Trump. This day is now officially known as National National Vietnam War Veterans Day.

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This week’s Throwback Thursday would like to belatedly recognize the formation of the Corps of Engineers in March 1779.

Although a “Chief Engineer of the Army” had been authorized for the Continental Army on 16 June 1775, there was no recognition for a separate Engineer branch, until Congress authorized President George Washington, on 16 March 1802, to organize a “Corps of Engineers…at West Point in the State of New York, and shall constitute a Military Academy.” In addition to running the Military Academy, and performing engineering tasks for the Regular Army, the Corps of Engineers performed vital civil engineering tasks for the new United States of America. West Point trained engineers surveyed roads, canals and borders, explored and mapped the Western frontier and oversaw the early construction of buildings in Washington D.C.
During the wars of the 1800s, the Corps of Engineers performed vital work in improving roads, bridges and fortifications necessary for the rest of the Army to perform its duties.
For service in World War I, the Corps grew from 256 officers and 2220 Soldiers to more than 11,000 officers and approximately 285,000 men. Combat engineers supported the divisions with roads, bridges and narrow gauge railways, which paved the way for the successful St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensives.
In the rear areas, railway engineer regiments improved French ports and built more than 20 million square feet of new construction. Furthermore, technically trained engineer officers were used to organize and lead new specialist units: tanks, chemical warfare munitions, and chemical defense equipment.
World War II saw an even greater expansion of the role and responsibilities of the Corps of Engineers with the introduction of mechanized warfare. Specialized engineer equipment, bulldozers, graders, and rollers, symbolized the industrial might of America brought to bear in making new roads and airfields. Engineers rapidly improved the ability to cross water obstacles with Bailey bridges, and handled the ever present threat of German minefields. Engineers adapted and improved amphibious doctrine, with obstacle demolition, rapid port clearance and over the shore fuel distribution only a few of the new innovations seen in the Corps of Engineers. At the end of World War II, over 323,000 of the 3 million service-members in Europe belongs to the Corps of Engineers.
The Corps performed similar service during the Korean and Vietnam wars, improving ports and depots, building airfields, landings strips and firebases, all connected with modern paved roads. In the field, Engineer combat troops learned how to perform route clearance operations against North Vietnamese mines and improvised explosive devices (IED). Equipped with an innovative “Roman Plow” an up-armored tractor with a tree cutting blade, combat Engineers supported convoys and search and destroy operations.
During Desert Shield, the Corps of Engineers oversaw a rapid expansion of bases and infrastructure sufficient to sustain both American and Coalition partners, more than one billion dollars in new projects. To support Desert Storm, combat Engineer units successfully supported a war of movement by breaching massive sand berms, locating and destroying Iraqi strongpoints, and using innovative new mine clearing rakes to plow through enemy minefields.
Today the US Army Corps of Engineers is comprised of more than 35,000 Active and Reserve Soldiers, and civilians employed around the globe. Since 9/11 Corps members have worked on construction projects and combat missions in Afghanistan and Iraq, as well as major reconstruction projects in the United States following major natural disasters. A large proportion of the tactical Engineer units in the total Army are in the Army Reserve, under the 412th and 416th Theater Engineering Commands.

Always Ready!

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For today's Watch Us Wednesday, we are observing the last week of Women's History month with a visit to Basic Training during WWII. The Nursing Corps.

Good Morning Wildcats!

For today's Trivia Tuesday;
Did you know?

Sunday was Medal of Honor Day!

Many individuals made remarks in recognition of this day, to include Gen. Mark Milley, Donald Trump, Mike Pence, 82nd Airborne, The U.S. Department of Defense among others

#Medal of Honor Day

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Hello Wildcats!

For today's Motivation Monday we would like to recognize a very special event that took place on Friday.

CW2 (P) Nildren Baldrich swore in her daughter, Annabelle Liz, who is enlisting in the Army Reserve as a 42A (HR Specialist)

Congratulations!
And Happy Motivation Monday!

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