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Tyndall Air Force Base - Panama City, FL

 

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“Bay District Teacher of the Year soars in more ways than one”

Cathy Felty, Bay District School’s Teacher of the Year, was recently given the opportunity of a lifetime, a familiarization flight in a T-38 Talon at Tyndall Air Force Base. Felty, media specialist teacher at Margaret K. Lewis School in Millville, was named Teacher of the Year for her innovation, advocacy, and decades of selfless work.

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“Maintenance Instructor keeps Tyndall Airmen mission-ready”

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua S. Self, 325th Maintenance Group maintenance training instructor, poses for a portrait at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., April 6, 2018. Self guides instruction and scheduling of 11 training ancillary courses, conducts course control document reviews and applies and updates processes to improve overall training environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sergio A. Gamboa/Released) #TyndallAFB #KnowYourMil

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Team Tyndall,

In planning for the upcoming GOAL DAY on Friday, April 20 please note the following areas/sections that will be CLOSED or OPEN with minimal manning for customer service.

Force Support Squadron

FSS offices will be CLOSED on Friday, April 20 with the following exceptions:

- Airman & Family Readiness Center: Normal Hours of Operation
- Arts and Crafts/Auto Hobby Shop: Normal Hours of Operation
- Berg Liles Dining Facility: CLOSED, Operation temporarily located in Horizons Club (0600-0800, 1100-1300, 1700-1900)
- Bowling Center: Normal Hours of Operation
- Child Development Center: Normal Hours of Operation
- Civilian Personnel Section: Normal Hours of Operation
- Education Office: Normal Hours of Operation
- FamCamp: Normal Hours of Operation
- Fitness Center: OPEN, 1000-1800
- ITT: Normal Hours of Operation
- Installation Personnel Readiness: CLOSED
- Library: Normal Hours of Operation
- Manpower: CLOSED
- Marina: CLOSED FOR RENOVATIONS
- Military Personnel Section Customer Support (CACs/ID Cards ONLY): OPEN 0730-1530
- NAF HRO: CLOSED
- Oasis Sports Lounge/Horizons: Normal Hours of Operation
- Outdoor Recreation: Normal Hours of Operation
- Pool: CLOSED until May 26
- Raptor Quick Turn: Normal Hours of Operation
- RRRP Recycle: OPEN, 0600-1230
- StudioTY/FSS Marketing: Normal Hours of Operation
- Youth Center: Normal Hours of Operation

For assistance with questions, please contact (850) 890-8749. For an updated listing of FSS hours, events, and activities, please visit the FSS website: http://www.325fss.com

Security Forces Squadron

SFS Staff Offices will be CLOSED on Friday, April 20 and will re-open Monday, April 23. The following offices will be OPEN:
- Pass and Registration/Visitor Control Center (VCC): OPEN on Friday, April 20.
- Reports and Analysis: OPEN on Friday, April 20.
- Commercial Vehicle Search Gate: OPEN on Friday, April 20.

PLEASE NOTE: DEJARNETTE ROAD will be closed from the intersection of Sabre Drive to the area of Natural Resources on Tuesday, April 24 from 0800-1500 hrs for maintenance. Sabre Gate will remain open and accessible via Sabre Drive during this period. Please plan ahead and remain flexible. Stay alert for lane adjustments due to the maintenance. Thank you for your patience! Contact 283-COPS for any questions.

Medical Group

Medical Group Main Clinic: CLOSED Friday, April 20
- Dental Clinic: CLOSED Friday, April 20
- Mental Health: CLOSED Friday, April 20
- Satellite Pharmacy: CLOSED Friday, April 20

PLEASE NOTE: If you are having an emergency please dial 911.

For all Urgent/Non-emergent needs contact the Nurse Advice Line at 1-800-TRICARE (874-2273) or our afterhours service at (850) 283-2778.

If you need routine or follow-up care you can make an appointment on TRICARE Online or request an appointment through our Relayhealth Secure Messaging System. Note that dependents no longer need a referral for Urgent Care. Active duty must call the Nurse Advice Line or Flight Doc for a referral when the clinic is closed.

Civil Engineering Squadron
- Fire Dept will be in-service and can be reached at (850) 283-4777
- The 24/7 CES Customer Service line will be available at (850) 283-4949
- Dorm Management Office will be CLOSED
- EOD - Minimal Manning / standby due to WEG flying operations
- Installation Management - Normal Operations
- Engineering - Normal Operations
- Operations - Minimal Military Manning
- Emergency management - Minimal Manning
- Gov’t Housing Office will be OPEN and normal hours

Communications Squadron

All Comm offices will be CLOSED on Friday, April 20 with the following exceptions:

PSC: OPEN: 0800-1700, Friday, April 20
OPEN: 0800-1200, Saturday, April 21
USPS: OPEN: 1000-1400, April 20

For Comm emergencies throughout the weekend call the Comm Focal Point and Standby Personnel, (850) 283-4896.

Comptroller Squadron and Wing Staff Agencies

Wing Staff Agencies and Comptroller Squadron will be CLOSED on Friday, April 20. Following are contact numbers in case of an emergency:
- Command Post: Normal Operations, (850) 283-2155
- SARC: Standby contact Crisis Action Line, (850) 625-1231
- Chapel: Standby contact through Command Post, (850) 283-2155
- XP: Standby contact through Command Post, (850) 283-2155
- Safety: Standby Contacts: Occupational (850) 774-6961, Flight (850) 774-6962, Weapons (850) 774-6960
- Public Affairs: Standby contact through Command Post, (850) 283-2155
- IG: Standby contact through Command Post, (850) 283-2155
- JA: Standby contact through Command Post, (850) 283-2155
- Comptroller: Standby contact through Command Post, (850) 283-2155

Commissary

Normal business hours for Friday, April 20: 0900-800

AAFES

Normal hours of operation for Friday, April 20:

Main Store: 0900-1800
MCS: 0900-1700
Express: 0600-2100
Felix Lake: 0600-2100
Taco Bell: 1030-1600
Charley’s: 1000-1730
Burger King: 0600-1830
Happy Cup: 0630-1400
GNC: 0900-1800
Barber Shop: 0800-1800
Flight Line Barber: 0730-1600
Laundry Dry Cleaners: 0900-1730
Alterations: 0900-1730
Optical Shop: 0930-1730

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Team Tyndall,

Here is what’s coming to Tyndall this week...

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Team Tyndall,

Come out this Saturday, April 21 for the Tidy Up for the Turtles Beach Clean-Up! Help 325th CES Natural Resources keep Tyndall Beach beautiful. For more information, please see the story and flyer below.

“Tyndall Beach Clean-up”

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. –
The 325th Civil Engineer Squadron Natural Resources Flight will be hosting the “Tidy Up for the Turtles Beach Clean-Up” on Saturday, April 21, 2018.

“We hope to clean at least six miles of the beach, three miles of Crooked Island West, and three miles of Shell Island,” said Rebecca Johnson, 325th CES Natural Resources Flight wildlife technician. “We ask that all participants bring work gloves and good walking shoes. Additionally, sunscreen, a hat and a water bottle would also be recommended.”

Although this is the first year that this specific clean-up event will be hosted, Tyndall does have other beach clean-up opportunities planned. The 325th CES is scheduled to sponsor an annual beach clean-up in September that correlates with International Coastal Clean-up Day.

There is no sign-up for the event and volunteers only need to show up at the NCO Beach House at 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.

In addition to having the beaches remaining in pristine condition for Airmen and their families, volunteers can reflect on their service with a larger sense of purpose.

“The impact of a beach clean-up is immense,” said Johnson. “While we do not have the problems that most public beaches have with beach-goers leaving trash on the beach, there is quite a bit of garbage that washes ashore. The importance of keeping all of this debris off our beaches is important not only for aesthetic purposes, but also for the environmental protection of the several endangered animals that call the beach and Gulf their home.”

According to the Environmental Protection Agency’s factsheet on “The Impacts of Mismanaged Trash” from their Trash-Free Waters initiative, all trash can be harmful to marine life. Plastic trash has the greatest potential to harm the environment, wildlife and humans.

Trash can be found floating at the surface, suspended in the water column, or on the bottom of almost all water bodies. It is transported by rivers to the ocean, where it moves with the currents, and is often eaten by birds and fish, concentrating toxic chemicals in their tissues, and filling their stomachs, causing them to starve.

“Being able to provide stewardship for their habitat is such a wonderful benefit for all of us who live here at Tyndall,” said Johnson. “It gives us a unique opportunity to see animals that most will never get the chance to encounter. There are four species of sea turtles, and several shorebirds that nest directly on Tyndall beaches and keeping the beach free of obstacles is crucial to their survival.”

For more information about Tyndall’s ecosystem and how to volunteer to get involved, call Beckie Johnson at (850) 541-3517 or (850) 283-2822.

For information of the EPA’s “Trash-Free Waters” initiative and what you can do to help, visit: https://www.epa.gov/trash-free-waters

Story by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller, 325th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

This story and more can be found on our website at www.tyndall.af.mil.

#TyndallAFB #AirForce

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Team Tyndall,

A cold front is expected to move through our area this weekend. Moderate thunderstorms, gusty winds and rain are expected for the Florida panhandle late Saturday night into Sunday morning.

BE ADVISED: Winds will be SSE with wind speeds at 25 kts (approx. 30 mph) sustained, and gusts up to 40 kts (approx. 46 mph).

Please take time to walk around the outside of your home and secure any loose items.

The website for our National Weather Service region is easily accessible and can provide valuable weather information, https://www.weather.gov/tae/.

If you have any questions, contact Tyndall's Weather Flight at (850) 283-2609.

Here is an important message from Tyndall’s MAJCOM, Air Combat Command, about the 2018 Air Force Assistance Fund Campaign, which runs through May 4.

Attention 325th Medical Group customers,

Starting Thursday, April 12, until further notice there will be temporary parking lot and road closures surrounding the MDG Clinic.

In an effort to upgrade your clinic, a new phase of construction is beginning, which will result in the closure of portions of Magnolia Circle and Illinois Avenue on the Southeast MDG campus, along with the parking closest to the Pediatrics/Women’s Health Clinics starting today until further notice.

Please plan ahead and remain flexible. Thank you for your patience. If you have any questions, please call (850) 283-7102.

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Please help the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission identify a person of interest:

“We need your help to identify a woman who accessed a protected Critical Wildlife Area on Crooked Island West. During the morning of March 15, the woman in the video passed signs, flags and rope to enter Tyndall CWA, causing a nesting snowy plover to flush from its nest leaving three eggs exposed. The woman appears to see the nest, and 60 seconds later the eggs and woman are gone from the camera’s range. Adult birds can be seen coming back to the nest and searching for their eggs to no avail. The snowy plover and its eggs are protected. If you can help us identify the individual in these images, please call our Wildlife Alert Hotline at 888-404-FWCC (3922). Our investigators would like to speak to the woman. As always, thank you for your support!

CWAs are established by the FWC to protect important wildlife concentrations from human disturbance during critical periods of their life cycles, such as nesting or migration. More info on CWAs is available at MyFWC.com/CWA”

Help us identify a person of interest

Help us identify a person of interestWe need your help to identify a woman who accessed a protected Critical Wildlife Area on Crooked Island West. During the morning of March 15, the woman in the video passed signs, flags and rope to enter Tyndall CWA, causing a nesting snowy plover to flush from its nest leaving three eggs exposed. The woman appears to see the nest, and 60 seconds later the eggs and woman are gone from the camera’s range. Adult birds can be seen coming back to the nest and searching for their eggs to no avail. The snowy plover and its eggs are protected. If you can help us identify the individual in these images, please call our Wildlife Alert Hotline at 888-404-FWCC (3922). Our investigators would like to speak to the woman. As always, thank you for your support!CWAs are established by the FWC to protect important wildlife concentrations from human disturbance during critical periods of their life cycles, such as nesting or migration. More info on CWAs is available at MyFWC.com/CWAU.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Tyndall Air Force Base

Posted by MyFWC on Monday, April 9, 2018

Team Tyndall,

The Florida Department of Transportation is performing concrete median replacement at the south end of the Dupont Bridge from Wednesday, April 11 to Thursday, April 19.

Due to the work within the right of way, Highway 98 Northbound from FamCamp through the Dupont Bridge will have the left lane closed. Southbound traffic from the Dupont Bridge onto Tyndall will remain opened.

Please plan ahead and remain flexible. Stay alert for lane adjustments due to the maintenance. Thank you for your patience.

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Team Tyndall,

As we enter into the warmer months, the 325th Civil Engineer Squadron will begin mosquito fogging operations starting Tuesday, April 10 to mitigate mosquitos until further notice. These operations will take place during the weekdays, usually between the hours of 5 - 7 a.m., in various locations throughout Tyndall AFB (to include housing).

Although the mosquito fogging will be varied in terms of location, schedule, and frequency; 325 CES will inform Balfour Beatty in advance so a message can be sent out to housing residents prior to fogging operations in housing.

The mosquito fogging operations pose no hazard to public health, but recommend remaining clear of fogging until it dissipates to avoid any unforeseen inconveniences. Our personnel shall actively pause or cease fogging if there are personnel in the immediate area of fogging.

If there are any questions or concerns, please contact Public Health at (850) 283-7138 or 325 CES Customer Service at (850) 283-4949.

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Please join us in congratulating Team Tyndall's newest promotees!

Please join us in congratulating Team Tyndall's newest promotees!

Posted by Tyndall Air Force Base on Monday, April 2, 2018

Online bulletin board used to share information about events on and around Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida.

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Team Tyndall,

The Berg-Liles Dining Facility (DFAC) will be closed for preventative facility maintenance starting Sunday, April 1 until further notice.

The Horizons Community Center will be the primary feeding venue for dormitory residents (ESM card holders) 7 days a week for 3 meals per day. Also, as an alternative option, the Raptor Quick Turn (flightline kitchen) will be open for Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner and Midnight meals Monday thru Friday.

New Process: Airmen will sign in at Horizons at the counter next to Ballroom A. They will then be provided instructions on where to proceed for their meals.

Below are the meal times for each facility:

Horizons Community Center Weekdays

Breakfast: 0600-0800
Lunch: 1100-1300
Dinner: 1700-1900

Horizons Community Center Weekends

Brunch: 0700-1300
Lunch: 1100-1300
Dinner: 1700-1900

RQT Weekdays

Breakfast: 0600-0800
Lunch: 1030-1330
Dinner: 1700-1900
Midnight: 2300-0100
NOTE: Closed Weekends!

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“Bolts, bows and boats”

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. –
The military lifestyle presents unique challenges for Airmen and their families; maintaining the balance between professional and personal life can be an issue at the forefront of their lives. For one Tyndall Airman, his unique hobby allows him an avenue to escape the daily occurrences and live in the moment.

By day, Staff Sgt. Taylor Price is a biomedical equipment technician from the 325th Medical Group. He inspects, maintains and repairs the medical equipment needed to ensure that Tyndall’s medical professionals can continue to care for patients. During his off time, Price enjoys fishing in a rather unique fashion, with a bolt, bow and his boat.

Growing up in a small town near a freshwater river, Price got into bow fishing at a young age, but his interest in it was cemented later in life while he was stationed in Ohio at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. He and a few friends would walk creek banks looking for fish or go out at night on Price’s boat lined with lights.

“You need to have the patience to learn and time shots properly, the patience to persevere on a slow night, and the patience to deal with the frustration of misses,” Price said. “The focus comes in when you are trying to determine what move a fish may make when they run. It’s easy to just launch an arrow at a fish, but it’s much harder to read the fish and determine the next turn and make the shot count.

“It’s an experience unlike any other kind of fishing, it’s a lot more active,” Price continued. “It’s a difficult hobby to get into; lots of money and time invested. It takes patience and time to develop the skill necessary. I went home empty handed a lot at first.”

Price went on to talk about the importance of minimizing stressors during off-duty hours.

“It’s definitely good to help separate the work life from the home life,” Price said. “When you get off work on a Friday afternoon and all you can think about is going to go get the boat hooked up and getting ready to go, stressors, life, work, everything’s just not there. You don’t think about it a single bit.”

Price believes Tyndall is a prime location for his hobby, because of the mix of both salt and freshwater in the area as well lakes and rivers.

“There is no better experience than being out on the boat in the middle of the night, nothing but lights on around you and some good music on the radio,” Price said.

Offering advice to fellow Airmen, Price recommends that Airmen go out and enjoy the areas surrounding Tyndall.

“If you’re not out there having a good time, enjoying the beautiful beaches and awesome food, then you are missing out. This area is great,” Price added. “It’s a vacation destination for so many people and you live here, how can you complain about that?”

(Note: All local and state laws pertaining to fishing are published and must be understood prior to taking on a hobby like bow fishing. Be aware of any permits and fishing seasons that may be required to fish in your area.)

Story by Airman 1st Class Isaiah J. Soliz, 325th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Video by Senior Airman Tybee Hurst, 325th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

This story and more can be found on our website at www.tyndall.af.mil.

#TyndallAFB #AirForce

U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) | United States Air Force | Air Combat Command | Gen Mike Holmes | ACC Command Chief

Bolts, bows and boats

“Bolts, bows and boats”TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. –The military lifestyle presents unique challenges for Airmen and their families; maintaining the balance between professional and personal life can be an issue at the forefront of their lives. For one Tyndall Airman, his unique hobby allows him an avenue to escape the daily occurrences and live in the moment. By day, Staff Sgt. Taylor Price is a biomedical equipment technician from the 325th Medical Group. He inspects, maintains and repairs the medical equipment needed to ensure that Tyndall’s medical professionals can continue to care for patients. During his off time, Price enjoys fishing in a rather unique fashion, with a bolt, bow and his boat. Growing up in a small town near a freshwater river, Price got into bow fishing at a young age, but his interest in it was cemented later in life while he was stationed in Ohio at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. He and a few friends would walk creek banks looking for fish or go out at night on Price’s boat lined with lights. “You need to have the patience to learn and time shots properly, the patience to persevere on a slow night, and the patience to deal with the frustration of misses,” Price said. “The focus comes in when you are trying to determine what move a fish may make when they run. It’s easy to just launch an arrow at a fish, but it’s much harder to read the fish and determine the next turn and make the shot count.“It’s an experience unlike any other kind of fishing, it’s a lot more active,” Price continued. “It’s a difficult hobby to get into; lots of money and time invested. It takes patience and time to develop the skill necessary. I went home empty handed a lot at first.”Price went on to talk about the importance of minimizing stressors during off-duty hours. “It’s definitely good to help separate the work life from the home life,” Price said. “When you get off work on a Friday afternoon and all you can think about is going to go get the boat hooked up and getting ready to go, stressors, life, work, everything’s just not there. You don’t think about it a single bit.”Price believes Tyndall is a prime location for his hobby, because of the mix of both salt and freshwater in the area as well lakes and rivers. “There is no better experience than being out on the boat in the middle of the night, nothing but lights on around you and some good music on the radio,” Price said. Offering advice to fellow Airmen, Price recommends that Airmen go out and enjoy the areas surrounding Tyndall. “If you’re not out there having a good time, enjoying the beautiful beaches and awesome food, then you are missing out. This area is great,” Price added. “It’s a vacation destination for so many people and you live here, how can you complain about that?”(Note: All local and state laws pertaining to fishing are published and must be understood prior to taking on a hobby like bow fishing. Be aware of any permits and fishing seasons that may be required to fish in your area.)Story by Airman 1st Class Isaiah J. Soliz, 325th Fighter Wing Public AffairsVideo by Senior Airman Tybee Hurst, 325th Fighter Wing Public Affairs This story and more can be found on our website at www.tyndall.af.mil.#TyndallAFB #AirForceU.S. Department of Defense (DoD) | United States Air Force | Air Combat Command | Gen Mike Holmes | ACC Command Chief

Posted by Tyndall Air Force Base on Monday, March 26, 2018

‪Many of you have asked, “When is this year’s air show?” The Gulf Coast Salute air show and open house is held at Tyndall Air Force Base every two years. The next GCS is tentatively scheduled for March 30-31, 2019. We hope to see you all there! And thank you for your continuous support!‬

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“Gary Sinise, Lt. Dan Band support Tyndall morale with free concert”

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. –
Gary Sinise and the Lt. Dan Band visited Tyndall Air Force Base and performed a free concert here March 4, 2018.

During the concert, attendees were entertained by a lively performance where the band played a medley of songs from classic rock to today’s hits.

“This is my first visit to Tyndall. I’ve been wanting to come here,” said Gary Sinise, founder of the Lt. Dan Band and the Gary Sinise Foundation. “Last year we hit Eglin and Patrick Air Force Bases in Florida. We are trying to get every base in Florida. We called [Col. Michael Hernandez, the 325th Fighter Wing commander] and basically offered the concert.”

“My foundation is the sponsor of the concert,” Sinise added.

The mission of the Gary Sinise Foundation, as stated on their website, is to serve their nation by honoring its defenders, veterans, first responders, their families and those in need. They do that by creating and supporting unique programs designed to entertain, educate, inspire, strengthen and build communities.

In addition to putting on the concert, Sinise also received a close look at one of Tyndall’s F-22 Raptors and met with some of the Airmen who maintain the iconic aircraft.

“The crew that is working on an F-22 out there showed me around the aircraft,” Sinise explained. “It was my second time being up close to an F-22. Last month we were at Edwards and I got to see an up close and personal look at an F-35 [Lightning II]. So, I get to do a lot of cool things and see our military up close. It’s very good to do that, because the more I can do it, the better advocate I can be for service members. I do want to be a good advocate, I appreciate what everyone does.”

“My time with the Tyndall Airmen was terrific. A good crew was out there. They are very dedicated, very hard working,” Sinise added.

After obtaining a firmer understanding of the aircraft and the Tyndall mission, the band started the concert on a stage as the sunset settled behind. The Airmen and their families were then entertained over the course of the next few hours with a live performance.

“Gary Sinise and the Lt. Dan Band put on a very entertaining show,” said Airman 1st Class Isaiah Soliz, a patron of the concert. “It was convenient that the show was put on for free and right on base. They played a wide range of music from classic rock like Journey and The Who to recent bands like the Zac Brown Band and Bruno Mars. Their entire crew put together one of the best performances I’ve seen in a long time.”

“They really have an appreciation for those serving our country and it shows through the work of the Gary Sinise Foundation,” he added.

Sinise concluded by explaining how he is able to put on concerts and operate the other programs his foundation provides for veterans, service members and those in need.

“We are producing [the concert] as we do with several concerts per year,” Sinise said. “And that is all because the American people support my foundation, and that allows me to go out there and deliver a message of appreciation to our men and women serving our country, but also bring some joy with the music and entertain everybody.”

This story and more can be found on our website at www.tyndall.af.mil.

#TyndallAFB #AirForce

U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) | United States Air Force | Air Combat Command | Gen Mike Holmes | ACC Command Chief

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Happy National K-9 Veterans Day! Here’s a story on one of TyndalI’s K-9 Veterans, Atila, and his partner, Staff Sgt. Caitlin Bourque.

“Partners of a different breed”

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. –
Most people who share a passion for dogs volunteer at shelters or adopt when they can, but some Airmen have a duty and bond with their canine friends that you can’t find anywhere else.

Staff Sgt. Caitlin Bourque is a military working dog handler for the 325th Security Forces Squadron at Tyndall Air Force Base. A military working dog handler is responsible for the care and training of his or her service dog, which contributes to combat operations abroad and installation security at home by providing target odor detection for both explosives and drugs.

Bourque joined the Air Force in 2013 to further her education and travel. She enlisted as a security forces specialist, a prerequisite for anyone wanting to become a working dog handler. She chose security forces because of family members serving previously in the very same job.

Bourque first realized her desire to work with canines when she was assigned a supervisor who was already a dog handler.

“He showed me the ropes and I immediately fell in love with the job,” Bourque said. “Having a dog as a partner is the best option in my opinion. These working dogs are selfless, loyal and extremely courageous. You can’t ask for anyone better to watch your back. Working with them on a daily basis is a lot of hard work and dedication, but it’s all worth it.”

Bourque attributes much of her motivations for the job to the joy she gets from bonding with Atila, her working dog partner, and knowing the importance of her duty. She said her favorite missions are the ones, which allow her to spend more time with her partner.

“I would definitely say I have a passion for animals,” Bourque said. “I love working with my dog and the other handlers every day. While being stationed at Tyndall, I have been on two Secret Service missions for both the president and vice president. The best part about these assignments is that I get to spend more one-on-one time with Atila.”

Bourque said she enjoys the mentality and professionalism that is instilled into all the Airmen in her unit.

“The guys trust me and respect my abilities as a handler just like I do all of them,” Bourque said. “Here it’s about the work you put in and the final product you can produce.”

Along with her professional life, Bourque is married and balances a relationship while serving as an Airman.

“With my job I travel a lot,” Bourque added. “That is one of the biggest challenges while serving and having a spouse. My family time is huge to me so being separated can be hard. She understands my job and its requirements though, so she never makes a fuss of it. We’ve been married going on two years this coming November.”

The partnership Atila and Bourque share has been a journey with its own unique set of challenges. Canines, like humans, have their own personalities and it can take time for a working dogs to get used to a new handler.

“Atila and I bumped heads when I was first assigned to him,” Bourque said. “He quickly proved to be one of the more difficult dogs I’ve handled. Eventually though, he started to warm up to me and our bond started to grow. We are becoming a more cohesive team every day.”

Bourque said for her personal goals she’d like to eventually open her own gym and finish her degree. She also said that she wishes to continue to work in the K-9 career field and grow as a handler.

“I’d really like to become a trainer and guide other handlers,” Bourque said. “I’d also like to advance Atila in his training, since one of us can’t grow without the other. The reason I love being around these dogs is because I know that I impact their lives just as much as they do mine on a daily basis.”

Because of her dedication and enthusiasm on the job, Bourque was given the opportunity to show Col. Michael Hernandez, 325th Fighter Wing commander, what it is like to be a military working dog handler. She was able to give him an idea of what it’s like to be a handler at Tyndall and how they would respond to various law enforcement scenarios that could occur on a military installation.

Story and photos by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller, 325th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

This story and more can be found on our website at www.tyndall.af.mil.

#TyndallAFB #AirForce

U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) | United States Air Force | Air Combat Command | Gen Mike Holmes | ACC Command Chief

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The Tyndall Chapel will host a FREE Movie Night for Kids this coming Saturday night!

Movie showing: TROLLS
Saturday, March 17 @ Chapel Annex
5 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Food, drinks, and popcorn provided. Kids are encouraged to come in their favorite PJs. Bring a sleeping bag/blanket and pillow. Parents are welcome to chaperone or drop off, but must be on time to pick up no later than 8:30 p.m.

This event is sponsored by the Protestant Chapel Community of Tyndall AFB.

If you have any questions please call (850) 283-2925.

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Online bulletin board used to share information about events on and around Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida.

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“Meet Retired U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Craig Deatherage”

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. –
Achieving the rank of chief master sergeant is quite the accomplishment in the Air Force, these top enlisted leaders serve as liaisons between the enlisted and officer force relating to readiness, welfare and effective utilization of enlisted forces.

Craig Deatherage retired from the Air Force as a chief master sergeant in 2010 after serving for over 20 years. During his service, he was the command chief for the 325th Fighter Wing at Tyndall Air Force Base. He would later move to Yokota Air Base, Japan before his retirement.

Deatherage’s main role at Tyndall was to, through communication with the enlisted corps, ensure the commander’s policies were known and understood. He ensured any concerns and issues were elevated to senior leadership. As a chief he carried with him years of experience in leading troops and getting the Air Force mission done.

“I spent 9 years as a chief and learned a lot in that time,” said Deatherage. “As a chief your word matters and the chances to make a difference for the better are tremendous. If you’re willing to own your decisions and follow them through you can really do some good.”

Before coming to Tyndall, he was the commandant of Gunter Non-Commissioned Officer Academy at Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala. There he oversaw the training of technical sergeants as they continued to advance their professional military educations. He ensured they were taught advanced leadership techniques and policies.

“One of my favorite jobs I ever had was the commandant of Gunter NCO Academy,” said Deatherage. “I felt like a square peg in a square hole. It was a great experience for me and I loved the job and would have stayed longer if they had let me.”

Deatherage was raised in Newton, Iowa and entered the Air Force in 1982. He is a career enlisted aviator with more than 3,900 hours total flying time in the E-3A/B/C and the E-8A/C. He flew over 200 combat flying hours during Operation Desert Storm and Operation Enduring Freedom, and served in various combat leadership positions such as a deployed squadron superintendent and first sergeant.

“I originally joined the Air Force because it provided me with a sense of purpose and belonging,” Deatherage said. “The Air Force became a family for me very fast. The first time I ever got on a plane was when I went to basic training so for me the Air Force offered a lot of personal development. It allowed me to go to both Iceland and Saudi Arabia within the first few years of my enlistment. Saudi Arabia was such a different experience for a kid from Iowa to see.”

After his retirement, Deatherage’s passion for the military and for those who serve did not wane. He started a job as the military and Veterans Affairs liaison for the U.S. House of Representatives in Florida’s Second District. Then, in 2015, he became the chief operations deputy for the Bay County supervisor of elections.

“The experience and skills I received from the Air Force equipped me for my current job working for Congressman Neal Dunn,” said Deatherage. “As a chief you have to be accessible to the Airmen while also being comfortable around general officers. This full spectrum experience is useful to have when working for a member of Congress.”

Deatherage gave his final thoughts on what the Air Force meant to him and what it means to be an effective leader.

“The Air Force gave me so much more than I ever dreamed of in my first 23 years of life,” Deatherage said. “The Air Force rounded me out as a person and made me complete, it made me understand that the notion of service before self is a critical part of life. The Air Force allowed me to live that out and instill it into my daughters. I met my wife in technical training, so it even gave me a beautiful wife with who I’ve been married to for almost 36 years. Ultimately it taught me that real leadership is the ability to not only motivate your Airmen, but to inspire them. If you’re able to remind your troops why they joined the service, then you can reconnect them with that sense of purpose and mission. To me that is when a leader is truly great.”

Story by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller, 325th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Video by Senior Airman Tybee Hurst, 325th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

This story and more can be found on our website at www.tyndall.af.mil.

#TyndallAFB #AirForce

U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) | United States Air Force | Air Combat Command | Gen Mike Holmes | ACC Command Chief

Tyndall Command Chief Retired, Craig Deatherage

“Meet Retired U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Craig Deatherage”TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. –Achieving the rank of chief master sergeant is quite the accomplishment in the Air Force, these top enlisted leaders serve as liaisons between the enlisted and officer force relating to readiness, welfare and effective utilization of enlisted forces.Craig Deatherage retired from the Air Force as a chief master sergeant in 2010 after serving for over 20 years. During his service, he was the command chief for the 325th Fighter Wing at Tyndall Air Force Base. He would later move to Yokota Air Base, Japan before his retirement.Deatherage’s main role at Tyndall was to, through communication with the enlisted corps, ensure the commander’s policies were known and understood. He ensured any concerns and issues were elevated to senior leadership. As a chief he carried with him years of experience in leading troops and getting the Air Force mission done.“I spent 9 years as a chief and learned a lot in that time,” said Deatherage. “As a chief your word matters and the chances to make a difference for the better are tremendous. If you’re willing to own your decisions and follow them through you can really do some good.”Before coming to Tyndall, he was the commandant of Gunter Non-Commissioned Officer Academy at Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala. There he oversaw the training of technical sergeants as they continued to advance their professional military educations. He ensured they were taught advanced leadership techniques and policies.“One of my favorite jobs I ever had was the commandant of Gunter NCO Academy,” said Deatherage. “I felt like a square peg in a square hole. It was a great experience for me and I loved the job and would have stayed longer if they had let me.”Deatherage was raised in Newton, Iowa and entered the Air Force in 1982. He is a career enlisted aviator with more than 3,900 hours total flying time in the E-3A/B/C and the E-8A/C. He flew over 200 combat flying hours during Operation Desert Storm and Operation Enduring Freedom, and served in various combat leadership positions such as a deployed squadron superintendent and first sergeant.“I originally joined the Air Force because it provided me with a sense of purpose and belonging,” Deatherage said. “The Air Force became a family for me very fast. The first time I ever got on a plane was when I went to basic training so for me the Air Force offered a lot of personal development. It allowed me to go to both Iceland and Saudi Arabia within the first few years of my enlistment. Saudi Arabia was such a different experience for a kid from Iowa to see.”After his retirement, Deatherage’s passion for the military and for those who serve did not wane. He started a job as the military and Veterans Affairs liaison for the U.S. House of Representatives in Florida’s Second District. Then, in 2015, he became the chief operations deputy for the Bay County supervisor of elections.“The experience and skills I received from the Air Force equipped me for my current job working for Congressman Neal Dunn,” said Deatherage. “As a chief you have to be accessible to the Airmen while also being comfortable around general officers. This full spectrum experience is useful to have when working for a member of Congress.”Deatherage gave his final thoughts on what the Air Force meant to him and what it means to be an effective leader.“The Air Force gave me so much more than I ever dreamed of in my first 23 years of life,” Deatherage said. “The Air Force rounded me out as a person and made me complete, it made me understand that the notion of service before self is a critical part of life. The Air Force allowed me to live that out and instill it into my daughters. I met my wife in technical training, so it even gave me a beautiful wife with who I’ve been married to for almost 36 years. Ultimately it taught me that real leadership is the ability to not only motivate your Airmen, but to inspire them. If you’re able to remind your troops why they joined the service, then you can reconnect them with that sense of purpose and mission. To me that is when a leader is truly great.”Story by Senior Airman Cody R. Miller, 325th Fighter Wing Public AffairsVideo by Senior Airman Tybee Hurst, 325th Fighter Wing Public AffairsThis story and more can be found on our website at www.tyndall.af.mil.#TyndallAFB #AirForceU.S. Department of Defense (DoD) | United States Air Force | Air Combat Command | Gen Mike Holmes | ACC Command Chief

Posted by Tyndall Air Force Base on Friday, March 9, 2018

This video from Tyndall's MAJCOM, Air Combat Command, demonstrates the evolution of air superiority, the challenges we face, and our confidence in the Airmen charged with the future of this mission. Thank you for your support of Tyndall, ACC, and of the United States Air Force.

ACC Air Superiority

This video from Tyndall's MAJCOM, Air Combat Command, demonstrates the evolution of air superiority, the challenges we face, and our confidence in the Airmen charged with the future of this mission. Thank you for your support of Tyndall, ACC, and of the United States Air Force.

Posted by Tyndall Air Force Base on Thursday, March 8, 2018

Online bulletin board used to share information about events on and around Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida.

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