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U.S. Army Combined Arms Center

 

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Several general officers recently spent a week at Fort Leavenworth for the Army Strategic Education Program-Command Course. The course was designed to complement Army and joint general officer courses to enhance leadership capabilities and warfighting competencies. Speakers included Gen. Robert B. Abrams, U.S. Army Forces Command commanding general; Gen. Stephen J. Townsend, Training and Doctrine Command commanding general and Lt. Gen. Michael D. Lundy, Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth commanding general.

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This Week In Combined Arms History!! #tbt

Redcoat Ambush: Braddock’s Defeat and the Battle of the Monongahela (1755)

https://usacac.army.mil/node/2095#overlay-context=node/2095

This week in Combined Arms Center History! #tbt

Redcoat Ambush: Braddock’s Defeat and the Battle of the Monongahela (1755)

https://usacac.army.mil/node/2095#overlay-context=node/2095

New Army PT Test on the way.

CAC Command Sergeant Major, Eric C. Dostie and other senior Fort Leavenworth senior noncomissioned officers conducted an NCO Professional Development session July 10th at the CAC Training Integration Facility.

Gen. Robert B. Abrams, U.S. Army Forces Command commanding general, talks to general officers gathered for the Army Strategic Education Program-Command course at the Lewis and Clark Center’s Arnold Conference Room July 9. The ASEP-CMD course is a developmental course for general officers to enhance leadership capabilities and warfighting competencies. The course is designed to complement Army and joint general officer educational courses. Photo by Tisha Swart-Entwistle, Combined Arms Center Public Affairs Office.

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Medical Department Activity and Munson Army Health Center Commander Col. Scott Mower led seven new Fort Leavenworth employees in the Civilian Oath of Office during in-processing July 9 at the Adjutant General Division building. The new employees include James Woods, National Simulation Center; Brian Anderson, Army University; Fayelee Overman, Command and General Staff College; Erik Borgenson, Mission Command Training Program; Kehgan McCalister, Combined Arms Center-Training; Miriam Bowman, U.S. Disciplinary Barracks and Donald Sichmeller, Directorate of Public Works. Photo by Tisha Swart-Entwistle, Combined Arms Center Public Affairs Office.

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This Week in Combined Arms History!

Ignominious Defeat: Young George Washington and the Battle of Fort Necessity (1754)

https://usacac.army.mil/node/2041

Command and General Staff College Professor featured on C-Span July 7

Dr. Shawn Faulkner's class on Vietnamization and the End of the Vietnam War that was recorded March 1 will be debut in the "Lectures in History" series on C-SPAN 3 Saturday, 7 July, at 8 p.m. and midnight Eastern time (7 p.m. and 11 p.m.
central).

https://www.c-span.org/video/?441500-1/tet-offensive-vietnam-wars-end

Kansas Governor Jeff Colyer and warrant officers from Fort Riley, Fort Leavenworth and the Kansas National Guard gathered at the Capitol in Topeka June 29 for the governor's signing of a proclamation recognizing July 2018 as the 'Month of the Warrant Officer.' The signing was in recognition of the U.S. Army Warrant Officer Cohort's 100th anniversary which was founded on July 9 1918 by congress.

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LT. Gen. Michael D. Lundy presents the Assumption of Responsibility Charter to the new director of the Mission Command Center of Excellence, Maj. Gen. Douclas C. Crissman, June 29 at the Frontier Conference Center on Fort Leavenworth. Maj. Gen. Crissman replaces Maj. Gen. James J. Mingus who will move to his next assignment as the Commander of the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. (U.S. Army Photo by Tisha Swart-Entwistle)

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Lt. Gen. Michael D. Lundy, commanding general of the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth, met with Dr. Douglas A. Girod, Chancellor of the University of Kansas on 29 June at the CAC headquarters. This was the first visit to Fort Leavenworth by Dr. Girod since taking over as the university's 18th chancellor in July 2017. The visit also included a tour of the Lewis and Clark Center and a visit to the Joint Center for International Security Force Assistance (JCISFA). (U.S. Army photo by Tisha Swart-Entwistle)

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This Week in Combined Arms History! #tbt

Defeat of the Wonder Boy King: Charles XII, Peter the Great and the Battle of Poltava Bridge (1709)

It should by now be a military maxim: never attempt a ground invasion of the Russian hinterland. Napoleon failed; Hitler was checked; and few European or Eurasian powers have succeeded in such endeavors. In the Great Northern War of the early 18th century, fought between two young kings – Peter the Great and Charles XII – the Swedes would learn the same lesson.

Charles XII was a dynamic and effective military commander. In the early years of the war, Sweden won several key victories over the Russian armies. However, in 1707-09, Charles attempted a land invasion and drove through the Ukraine, toward Moscow. Charles mustered only some 44,000 soldiers at the campaign’s start, but even these paltry numbers would dwindle as the Swedish were forced to guard lengthening supply lines and Peter I resorted to a scorched earth strategy and destroyed everything of use in the path of the Swedes’ invasion route.

By the spring of 1709, Charles’s dwindling forces began a siege of the city of Poltava. In response, Peter marched south with an army of some 80,000 men to relieve the siege. Peter was cautious and built a fortified camp for his army 4km north of the city. In early skirmishes, the brilliant Charles XII was wounded and forced to turn over operational control to one of his generals. Still, the Swedes – though outnumbered – opted for an aggressive strategy.

Charles’s forces attempted a surprise attack before dawn on 27 May, but the cavalry arrived late, having lost their way in the dark, and the Russians sounded the alarm with the firing of a pistol. The element of surprise was lost but still the Swedes persisted in the attack. The Swedish infantry seized the first several redoubts and forced the Russians back, but poor combined-arms coordination with the cavalry precluded a pursuit and the tempo of the attack could not be maintained.

Eventually the Swedish attack fell apart. The 55 Russian cannons bombarded the attackers from 500m up to 50m. The Russians, with superior numbers, had longer defensive lines than the attacking Swedes. When the left flank of the Swedish attack could not keep up, the Russian infantry and cavalry exploited the gap and enveloped the Swedish columns on the right. Charles and the remainder of his army fled into the nearby woods and barely escaped. Nevertheless, for the loss of some 5000 men, the Russians inflicted between 6-9000 casualties and captured about 3000 Swedes. Charles was forced to call off the siege.

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The Honorable Dr. Mark T. Esper presented the 2017 Distinguished Level Presidential Rank Award to Mr. Kirby R. Brown, deputy to the commanding general of the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth, while the TRADOC Deputy Commanding General Lt. Gen. Theodore D. Martin looks on during a formal recognition ceremony in Washington D.C. on 25 June. The award, signed by the President, is the highest award that career Senior Executive Service members can receive. No more that 1 percent of the Career SES civilians can receive this award.

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Thomas Jordan, deputy director for the Mission Command Center of Excellence, led 13 new Fort Leavenworth employees in the Civilian Oath of Office during a swearing-in ceremony at the Adjutant General building June 25. The new employees are Jason Biel with Mission Command Training Program, Sergio Ramos with Army University, James Watson with the Combined Arms Center, Florian Kardoskee with the Ike Skelton Combined Arms Research Library, William Lallement with Army University, Ava Santos with Army Research Institute, Joshua Johnson with ARI, Renee Adams with Army University, Lacie Rocha with MCTP, Derek Olsen with the International Military Student Division, William Hutchings with MCCoE, David Teater with the Army Management Staff College and Brian Stoffle with AMSC. (US Army Photo by Tisha Swart-Entwistle)

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Lt. Gen. Michael D. Lundy, Commanding General of the United States Army Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth, addresses students of the Advanced Strategic Planning and Policy Program (ASP3) on Friday in Flint Hall on Fort Leavenworth. ASP3 is a multi-year program that prepares field-grade officers for service as strategic planners through a combination of practical experience, professional military education, and a doctorate from a civilian university.

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This Week in Combined Arms history! #tbt

The End of the Covenanters: Scotland’s Rebellion and the Battle of Bothwell Bridge (1679)

Few battles were fought on British soil after the end of the English Civil War in the 1640s. Most were internal rebellions and separatist campaigns within the kingdom itself. One such event was the Battle of Bothwell Bridge, part of the Scottish Covenanter Wars. After the end of the civil war and the restoration ok King Charles II, Presbyterian Scots were persecuted for their non-Anglican (Church of England) beliefs. The most hard-liner Presbyterians continued to hold (illegal) outdoor meetings, known as conventicles. Government dragoons and soldiers attacked one such meeting but were routed on 1 June 1679 at Loudoun Hill. After this success, the covenanters built their strength and prepared to receive the next government attack.

The King’s son, James the Duke of Monmouth, led the government troops north to face Robert Hamilton and his covenanter forces. The covenanters, now some 6,000 strong, camped on the south bank of the Clyde River. They were poorly led, unorganized, and lacked unity of command. The government royalist troops (about 5,000) were outnumbered although better trained and deployed on better terrain – sloping ground on the north bank of the Clyde.

The main battle occurred near a narrow bridge across the river which Monmouth’s soldiers forced to attack the covenanters. One of the few covenanters with military experience, David Hackston, made a two hour long spirited defense of the bridge with just 300 troops until his men ran out of ammunition. He appealed for reinforcements but none were forthcoming from the disorganized main force. This forced a unilateral withdrawal.

When Hackston retreated, the Royalist army deployed unopposed on the south bank, formed ranks and surrounded the stunned covenanters. The ill-trained, poorly led rebels panicked, broke ranks and the defense collapsed. Part of the reason for the panic was the effective use of combined arms by the royalist troops who had redeployed their artillery to the south bank and fired off an intense, frightening cannonade. The covenanters could not respond in kind.

After the government troops forced the bridge, most rebels fled, taking hundreds of casualties. Many of the killed and wounded fell at the hands of the royalist cavalry, which the Duke of Monmouth unleashed to pursue the routed rebels. Some 1200 were taken prisoner. The prisoners were held in Edinburgh before being shipped off to the colonies in exile. The battle at Bothwell Bridge signaled the end of major combat operations and the defeat of the covenanters in the brief war.

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Lt. Gen. Michael Lundy, commanding general of the Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth, addresses participants of the Brigade Combat Tactical Commanders Development Program (BCTCDP) and Tactical Commanders Development Program (TCDP) on 18 June in Eisenhower Hall at Fort Leavenworth. The CAC commander had a candid discussion on command responsibilities including leader development, and tactics.

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Congratulations to the Graduates of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff Officers Course!

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